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The net delusion : the dark side of internet freedom

Author: Evgeny Morozov
Publisher: New York : Public Affairs, ©2011.
Edition/Format:   Print book : English : 1st edView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
This volume examines the evolving role of the Internet in activism, dissent, and authoritarian regimes. The author investigates the impact of a range of media on social revolution and activism from television in East Germany to Twitter during Iran's Green Revolution, intertwining that analysis with discussion of the ways governments are able to use the Internet for surveillance of political activity, propaganda  Read more...
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Details

Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Evgeny Morozov
ISBN: 9781586488741 1586488740 9781586488758 1586488759
OCLC Number: 515438457
Description: xvii, 409 pages ; 25 cm
Contents: The Google doctrine --
Texting like it's 1989 --
Orwell's favorite lolcat --
Censors and sensibilities --
Hugo Chavez would like to welcome you to the spinternet --
Why the KGB wants you to join Facebook --
Why Kierkegaard hates slacktivism --
Open networks, narrow minds : cultural contradictions of internet freedom --
Internet freedoms and their consequences --
Making history (more than a browser menu) --
The wicked fix.
Responsibility: Evgeny Morozov.

Abstract:

This volume examines the evolving role of the Internet in activism, dissent, and authoritarian regimes. The author investigates the impact of a range of media on social revolution and activism from television in East Germany to Twitter during Iran's Green Revolution, intertwining that analysis with discussion of the ways governments are able to use the Internet for surveillance of political activity, propaganda dissemination, and censorship. He analyzes the effect of the proliferation of available entertainment and access to consumer goods on the potential for political activity, arguing that opening societies to further consumerism and to Western cultural media has in some ways deterred political activism. The author's argument that the West conflates democratization with consumerism uncovers a critique of the West here for its complacent belief that the Internet and supposed freedom of information is a certain pathway to democratization.
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